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Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions |  Insurance Questions | Generic Drug Questions

 

General Questions

 

Can I have my prescription delivered?
Most prescriptions can be delivered within the Greater Fort Smith, Barling and Greenwood areas. The patient or their designated representative must be available to sign for the receipt of the delivery.

How long will it take to fill my prescription?
Once we receive your refill request, we will normally be able to have your prescription ready for you to pick up within 2 hours, if there are no complications. Compounded, expired, insurance pre-authorization, and no refill prescriptions will take longer, usually up to 72 hours. Please check with your pharmacist for specific information for your prescription order.

Why can’t I have more than a 1-month supply?
Most prescription insurance plans will have limits on the day’s supply of medication that can be dispensed, with one co-pay. There are also limits on the quantities of controlled substance prescriptions that can be dispensed at one filling. If a prescription is a cash prescription, reasonable supplies can be dispensed at one filling. Also, if your insurance company will pay for a larger quantity of medications, for one co-pay, your doctor must write the prescription for the larger amount.

What should I know about a new prescription from my doctor?
You should know what the prescription is for, under normal circumstances and how to take the medication. Your pharmacist will review your medication for you and see that no other medications that you are taking will cause problems with the new medication. It is important that you have all your prescriptions filled at one pharmacy for this reason.

Where do I store my medication?
Medications should be stored in a cool dry place, away from sunlight. Some medications, such as insulin, may require refrigeration. Bathrooms where showers or tubs are frequently used are not a good place for medication storage. Special storage instructions are contained on your patient information sheets. If you have questions about prescriptions you’ve purchased at our pharmacies, please consult our pharmacists.

What should I do if I miss a dose of my medication?
Instructions for what to do under these circumstances vary by medication. Please check with your pharmacist for specific instructions on your medications.

Do I take my medication with or without food?
Each medication will differ as to whether it should be taken with food. Auxiliary labels will frequently be placed on your prescription bottle to help you understand your specific situation. Also, patient information sheets are provided with each new prescription for your reading. And, as always, our pharmacists are available to answer any questions you may have about your prescriptions purchased at our pharmacies.

When do I take my prescription?
Medications will differ as to what time of day give the best results. Consult with your pharmacist for specific information on what is best for your prescription.

Why does my medication cost more this time than when I last had it filled?
Drug prices are not fixed and can increase as manufacturing costs increase or be reduced, as drugs become available generically. Insurance co-pays, drug tiers and deductibles are always changing and often result in fluctuating out of pocket expense.

Can my doctor call in a prescription?
Most prescriptions may be called in by your doctor. There are certain exceptions. Please consult your doctor or pharmacist for details.

How soon can I get a refill?
Your medication supply should last a specific number of days based on the type of prescription and the dosage. If you need to refill your prescription early and have a valid reason for doing so, our pharmacists can usually take care of that situation.

What are compounded prescription drugs?
Compounded prescriptions are those which your physician wants your pharmacist to custom make specifically for you, a formula that is not commercially available. These compounds are hand fabricated by your pharmacist and take much longer to prepare than those that are manufactured by various pharmaceutical companies.

Insurance Questions

How much is my co-pay?
If you have prescription insurance, your co-pay may differ depending on your insurance plan. Please consult your health insurance provider, refer to your human resource documents or call your insurance company or human resources department for details.

Do you accept this insurance?
The Health Depot accepts MOST area insurance’s. In the event of special circumstances, we can usually arrange our participation in a plan with a few simple phone calls.

Does my insurance cover this medication?
As is the case with co-pays, insurances will vary on what drugs they cover. Please consult your health insurance provider, refer to your human resource documents or call your insurance company or human resources department for details.

Why can’t I have more than a 1-month supply?
Most prescription insurance plans will have limits on the day’s supply of medication that can be dispensed with one co-pay. There are also limits on the quantities of controlled substance prescriptions that can be dispensed at one filling. If a prescription is a cash prescription, reasonable supplies can be dispensed at one filling. Also, if your insurance company will pay for a larger quantity of medications for one co-pay, your doctor must write the prescription for the larger amount.

Generic Drugs

What is the difference between a brand and generic medication?
Prescription drugs are protected by patent. Those patents last for many years from the discovery of the drug. After the patent expires, other drug companies can copy the formula for a medication and produce it much more cheaply than the brand price. The active ingredient in generic medications is exactly the same as the active ingredient in the brand drug.

Why is there a cost difference between brand and generic medication?
Drug companies are for profit companies. Creating a new drug entity is an extremely expensive undertaking. Drug companies recoup their expenses and make a profit by keeping drugs on patent and recouping their development expenses. They also expect to make a profit for their efforts during the time the drug is on patent.

Is there a generic drug for my medication?
Ask your physician or pharmacist if there is a generic medication that will meet your needs. Some medications are already off patent and are available generically. Your doctor can help you make a proper decision.

Why are some drugs not available as a generic?
Some medications are not available generically because their patent has not expired.